Chapel provides forum for political education

FORT WORTH, Texas (SWBTS) – Paige Patterson welcomed U.S. Senate hopeful Roger Williams (R-Texas) to Southwestern’s chapel service, April 26, for a brief Q&A session on stage with the seminary’s president.
 
Patterson said his goal was political education on behalf of his students. He believes it essential for Southwesterners to know who currently campaigns for office and each delegate’s political positions.
 
In his last two positions, at Criswell College and at Southeastern Seminary, Patterson made it “a standing rule that anybody running for public office is welcome to come to chapel and introduce himself and tell you briefly why it is you should vote for him.”
 
Patterson also told chapel attendees he hopes other political candidates will accept his offer of brief time behind the microphone, saying it was open to all candidates who would affect Southwestern students or any voters in this area, whether at the local, state, or national level. The tradeoff, however, being they will submit themselves to on-the-spot questions from the seminary president.
 
From the chapel stage, Williams said he would base his policy choices, if elected, on two things: the Bible and the Constitution “as it’s written, not as it’s interpreted to be.”
 
“I’m convinced that if I stick with the Constitution and the Bible, I’m going to be a really good public servant,” Williams said.
 
Patterson then asked him about his plans for his time in office, with questions addressing the budget and federal funding for Planned Parenthood. Williams replied he would ask Washington to balance the budget and address per-year budget cut numbers in trillions in order to do so. He also said he would vote to withdraw funding from Planned Parenthood because it is not a government entity.
 
Patterson also asked what footwear, if elected, he would wear to sessions in Washington, D.C. Williams stated proudly that he would wear his “Texas Justin cowboy boots.”
 
Williams served as Texas’ 105th Secretary of State (2004-2007) and is from Fort Worth. According to his candidate website, Williams describes himself as possessing “pro-jobs, pro-growth, pro-life values.”

Established 1908 Fort Worth, Texas